Tag Archives: wisdom

The Believing Neuron pt. 5/17 | Theory: How to see the 3D way

 

“Consciousness is a transparent brain representation of the world from a privileged egocentric perspective.”Dr Arnold Trehub

a Theoretical Model of how we visualise 3D space

a Theoretical Model of how we visualise 3D space

Figure 1.  A. Non-conscious creatures. E1 and E2 are discrete events in the physical world. R1 and R2 are sensory transducers in the body that selectively respond to E1 and E2. R1 and R2 signal their response to unconscious processing mechanisms within the brain. These mechanisms then trigger adaptive actions. B. Conscious creatures. In addition to the mechanisms described in A, the brain of a conscious creature has a retinoid system that provides a holistic volumetric representation of a spatial surround from the privileged egocentric perspective of the self-locus — the core self (I!). For example, in this case, there is a perspectival representation of E1 and E2 (shown as E1′ and E2′) within the creature’s phenomenal world. Neuronal activity in retinoid space is the entire current content of conscious experience.

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Retinoid ''self'' System -

Retinoid ”self” System -

Figure 2. - The self system (Trehub 2007). Neurons at the self-locus anchor the I-token (I!) to the retinoid origin of egocentric space. I! has reciprocal synaptic links to sensory and cognitive processes. Damage to the neuronal mechanisms below the dotted line results in cognitive impairment. Interruption of the synaptic link between the neurons at the origin of retinoid space (the self locus) and I! results in loss of consciousness.

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The Believing Neuron pt. 4/17 | Synaptic States

electric avenue

What are some |stoopid| things smart people do?

^-^   vs    ^-^

hahah.. this post is dedicated to all of you little minionz ,some wisdom ups for now by declaring 10 facts that trick your uber-complicated relation with existence.

SO,

1. Ignoring the importance of design and styleother ipod useWhen the  iPod originally came out, technical people complained  about its lack of features and perceived high price (“ooh, who cares about another MP3 player; I can go buy one at Best Buy for $50.”) In the meantime, it was so cool and easy to use that normal people went out in droves to buy it.

[a bit of hipster friendly example .. dont be happy u hipsters what u deserve is waiting in the corner]

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 2. Following the pack ALL FOLLOWMany smart people often seem to be followers, probably because they grow up spending so much time pleasing others via academic and extracurricular achievement that they never figure out what they really like to work on or try anything unique. Smart people from top schools tend to flock into the same few elite fields, as they try to keep on achieving what other people think they should achieve, rather than figuring out whatever it is they intrinsically want to do.

[ thug life is and has always been  a smart first move for change..Extraterrestrial]

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3. Failing to develop social skillsswanson_jpg_627x325_crop_upscale_q85

Some smart people focus exclusively on their narrow area of interest and never realize that everything important in life is accomplished through other people. They never try to improve their social skills, learn to network, or self-promote, and often denigrate people who excel in these areas. If you are already a good engineer, you are going to get 10x the return on time spent improving how you relate to other people compared to learning the next cool tool.

[hmm ...bacon stripes .. bacn stips (extreme saliva flow atm)]

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4. Focusing on being right above all elsetumblr_lyj0zflPe51qmxvwlo1_500

Many smart people act as if being right trumps all else, and go around bluntly letting people know when they are wrong, as if this will somehow endear others to them. They also believe that they can change other people’s minds through argument and facts, ignoring how emotional and irrational people actually are when it comes to making decisions or adopting beliefs.

[our well known chill-ninja fella above still murmurs about being no.4 ..]

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5. Letting success in one area lead to overconfidence in others JackHidesBallLakers

Smart people sometimes think that just because they are expert in their field, they are automatically qualified in areas about which they know nothing. For instance, doctors have a reputation as being bad investors.

GOING ON -

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The Believing Neuron pt. 3/17 | Versatile

natural_perception chris lastufka

—–^—–

 concept design 

Soul of King - Zhuangyue Xiao(+)

[click to enlarge]

[click to enlarge]

the rapid development of human society is built on the ‘basis’ of some at the expense of nature, that cannot be ignored by the violation there has been

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STEP ONE

Determine the major composition, the role of the location of the arrangementssoul of a king 1

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STEP TWO

Determine the atmosphere light efficiency, distribution-being comparedsoul of a king 2

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STEP THREE

describe details of the deal with the depth of fieldsoul of a king 3

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STEP FOUR

Add elements, gray moldsoul of a king 4

——–

VERSATILE

 

The Believing Neuron pt. 2/17 | Inverted Spectrum Process

turning you into mad.architectz is not an eazzy way so here is a way to go with it ..

[Bonus to start with+5% ]

 all experience is mediated by the brain, the mind is what the brain does. No brain,no mind. if a part of the brain is destroyed through injury etc that brain function – that ”mind” part of the brain- may be rewired into another neural network ”

hahah. supposedly THAT could be a turning point for some of you.

SO

lets.get.gangsta

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eggz on break

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feelin frisky? either ways you can take it further.- wanna be efficient in your own way? there are always ways to motivate yourself, especially on trying to complex every little project(nionion) in order to take the most out of it.

not always the best way to go -> fo sho!

ex.

a homemade network of concrete tunnels 32 feet underground

”Smithsonian Institution entomologist Harrison G. Dyar came forward to admit that he had dug the tunnels when had lived in the capital of D.C 10 years earlier”

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The Believing Neuron pt. 1/17 | Things you wouldnt believe you can achieve

/architecture students special\

ok.  speaking from experience, you all wannabes try to thrive through everything so your NEXT presentation concept would be unique -

Something like that is nice to try but you should know the way how first..

  ..i guess!!

Minion friendly FG a.t.m

HMMM

”get out. of your knowledge surroundings!”Le.FG

ex.1

There is a blind guy who can ride his bike in traffic

echotastic

he’s figured out to use echolocation by clicking his tongue and listening to the echoes. He can tell a building from as far as 1000 feet away, differentiate specific kinds of cars, explore the wilderness by himself, and generally do all kinds of crazy shit.

..weird huh?

ex.2

Pointer-finger to Ring-finger ratio

right point index finger

In men and boys, the right pointer finger is shorter in relation to their right ring finger than it is in girls. The higher your testosterone level before birth, the lower your pointer-finger-to-ring-finger ratio. Men with the lowest ratios made the most money and stayed in business for the longest time.

..hmm this one was for balance. forwarding the next one-

ex.3 (best!)

You live in the past.

you live in the past

About 80 milliseconds in the past, to be precise. Use one hand to touch your nose, and the other to touch one of your feet, at exactly the same time. You will experience them as simultaneous acts. But that’s mysterious — clearly it takes more time for the signal to travel up your nerves from your feet to your brain than from your nose. The reconciliation is simple: our conscious experience takes time to assemble, and your brain waits for all the relevant input before it experiences the “now.” Experiments have shown that the lag between things happening and us experiencing them is about 80 milliseconds.

80milsec. ahead of being in front

DIZZED ENOUGH? HERE IS SOME MORE –> Continue reading

Einstein’s God

”The problem involved is too vast for our limited minds. We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It does not know how. It does not understand the languages in which they are written. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn’t know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being toward God. We see the universe marvelously arranged and obeying certain laws but only dimly understand these laws.”

gist out of it?

Some math skills//Penrose tilings

time to get really serial….

we decided to give you an extra piece of super serial wisdom for your TRUE architecture….

so some experience points that are going to be serially appreciated by all of those parammetric/grasshopper freaks out there….

Penrose tilings

Penrose tiling is a non-periodic tiling generated by an aperiodic set of prototiles. Penrose tilings are named after mathematician and physicist Roger Penrose who investigated these sets in the 1970s. The aperiodicity of the Penrose prototiles implies that a shifted copy of a Penrose tiling will never match the original. A Penrose tiling may be constructed so as to exhibit both reflection symmetry and fivefold rotational symmetry, as in the diagram below.

A Penrose tiling has many remarkable properties, most notably:

  • It is non-periodic, which means that it lacks any translational symmetry. More informally, a shifted copy will never match the original.
  • It is self-similar, so the same patterns occur at larger and larger scales. Thus, the tiling can be obtained through “inflation” (or “deflation”) and any finite patch from the tiling occurs infinitely many times.
  • It is a quasicrystal: implemented as a physical structure a Penrose tiling will produce Bragg diffraction and its diffractogram reveals both the fivefold symmetry and the underlying long range order.
Penrose tilings are simple examples of aperiodic tilings of the plane.A tiling is a covering of the plane by tiles with no overlaps or gaps; the tiles normally have a finite number of shapes, called prototiles, and a set of prototiles is said to admit a tiling or tile the plane if there is a tiling of the plane using only tiles congruent to these prototiles. The most familiar tilings (e.g., by squares or triangles) are periodic: a perfect copy of the tiling can be obtained by translating all of the tiles by a fixed distance in a given direction. Such a translation is called a period of the tiling; more informally, this means that a finite region of the tiling repeats itself in periodic intervals. If a tiling has no periods it is said to be non-periodic. A set of prototiles is said to beaperiodic if it tiles the plane, but every such tiling is non-periodic; tilings by aperiodic sets of prototiles are called aperiodic tilings.

Early aperiodic tables

The subject of aperiodic tilings received new interest in the 1960s when logician Hao Wang noted connections betweendecision problems and tilings. In particular, he introduced tilings by square plates with colored edges, now known as Wang dominoes or tiles, and posed the “Domino Problem“: to determine whether a given set of Wang dominoes could tile the plane with matching colors on adjacent domino edges. He observed that if this problem were undecidable, then there would have to exist an aperiodic set of Wang dominoes. At the time, this seemed implausible, so Wang conjectured no such set could exist.

an aperiodic set of Wang dominoes

Robinson’s six prototiles

The first Penrose tiling(P1 below)  is also an aperiodic set of six prototiles, introduced by Roger Penrose in a 1974 paper, but is based on pentagons rather than squares. Any attempts to tile the plane with regular pentagons will necessarily leave gaps, but Johannes Kepler showed, in his 1619 work Harmonices Mundi, that these gaps could be filled using pentagrams (viewed as star polygons), decagons and related shapes. Acknowledging inspiration from Kepler, Penrose was able to find matching rules (which can be imposed by decorations of the edges) for these shapes, in order to obtain an aperiodic set; his tiling can be viewed as a completion of Kepler’s finite Aa pattern, and other traces of these ideas can be found in Albrecht Dürer’s work.

Penrose subsequently reduced the number of prototiles to two, discovering the kite and dart tiling(P2) and the rhombus tiling(P3). The rhombus tiling was independently discovered by Robert Ammann in 1976. Penrose and John H. Conway investigated the properties of Penrose tilings, and discovered that a substitution property explained their hierarchical nature; their findings were publicized by Martin Gardner in his January 1977 “Mathematical Games” column in Scientific American.

In 1981, De Bruijn explained a method to construct Penrose tilings from five families of parallel lines as well as a “cut and project method”, in which Penrose tilings are obtained as two-dimensional projections from a five-dimensional cubic structure. In this approach, the Penrose tiling is viewed as a set of points, its vertices, while the tiles are geometrical shapes obtained by connecting vertices with edges.

The pentagonal Penrose tiling (P1) drawn in black on a colored rhombus tiling (P3) with yellow edges.

A P1 tiling using Penrose’s original set of 6 prototiles

Pentagon with an inscribed thick rhomb (light), acute Robinson triangles (lightly shaded) and a small obtuse Robinson triangle (darker). Dotted lines give additional edges for inscribed kites and darts.

Partial inflation of star to yield rhombs, and of a collection of rhombs to yield an ace.

some xtra cool visuals to boost your creativity……

*bonus_cos’ we aint no nerds…*

(ha ha…gotcha)