Tag Archives: movie making

Ferdinando Scarfiotti // Toys

Holla, this one of the post that should be classified under “creative inspiration” or something like that; you get the point.

“By 1987 Scarfiotti was firmly ensconced in Los Angeles, but he returned briefly to Italy for a terrific little picture called Mamba. The plot is a vicious treat: Gregg Henry plays a sneering, self-contained software magnate who elects to punish his ex-lover (Trudi Styler) by penning her within her apartment in the company of a drug-crazed snake. The mamba has the luxurious advantage of an hour in which to puncture its prey before overdosing on venom, but it finds in Styler a resourceful opponent. The loft which Scarfiotti designed for Styler is a riot of postmodern design flourishes in the seriously playful style of Ettore Sottsass, accordingly making merry with conventional notions of architectural syntax. It is a kind of erotic fantasy for subscribers to Blueprint, so much so that, when in the course of her frenetic flight from the mamba, Styler scatters her furniture and tarnishes her pristine floors, the viewer feels a sharp and unexpected pang of sorrow.

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This was no idle threat, so to speak. Scarfiotti’s touchstone for Toys would be the Italian Futurist Fortunato Depero, a crackerjack of all trades whose inventions included patterned waistcoats, bolted books, sets for Diaghilev, and covers for Vanity Fair. The choice was inspired. Depero had also been a compulsive maker and illustrator of figurines, and, with Giacomo Balla, penned in 1915 Futurist Reconstruction of the Universe, hymning a new world order ’run according to the principles of the Futurist toy’. M Depero’s joyful paeans to fighting dolls (not nearly so grimace-worthy as Marinetti’s conviction that war was a form of hygiene for civilisation) gave Scarfiotti a line straight into the highly coloured whimsy Toys required.

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Models, sets, dolls and cameras

I know how excited you all are when realizing that many scenes from your favorite movies have been shot in physical models (SS example : Coraline)

Lets take it back to oldskool references on this topic

1) Dolls Replace Drawings in Film Cartoon (Jun, 1938)

Dolls Replace Drawings in Film Cartoon

THOUSANDS of carved wooden dolls give a three-dimensional effect to a new type of animated-cartoon film developed by George Pal, Hungarian photographic expert. Instead of using pictures drawn and photographed in sequence to provide movement, the new cartoon-film technique employs numerous doll figures carved and painted to represent the various movements and facial expressions of a single cartoon character. As many as thirty different carvings of one figure may be photographed in sequence for one simple change in a facial expression.

2) Lilliputian’s-eye viewer puts you inside tiny model (Aug, 1964)

This makes those dorky 3D walk-throughs seem a lot more useful doesn’t it?

Lilliputian’s-eye viewer puts you inside tiny model

A slender optical tube fitted with 18 miniature lenses provides realistic views inside architects’, landscapers’, town planners’, and other scale models. With a camera and adapter on the eyepiece, you get photos like the circular ones at left.

The British-made Modelscope is a combination microscrope, periscope, and telescope with an aperture at one side .3 inch from the end. On the floor of a 1:200 model, this corresponds to eye level at the same scale. At other heights, it shows vistas from windows, balconies, and other points. Made by Optec Reactors, Ltd., of London, the unit is distributed in the U.S. by H. C. I. Sales Corp., NYC.

via ModernMechanix (+)

Rear Window \\ Visual Installation

based on footage from Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rear Window” (1954)

 Jeff Desom( freelance director, film maker),

introduced a project that took him 6 weeks for completeness as a final time-lapse video

Software used: After Effects / Photoshop / Coffee

Fo and Go

dAY

REAR WINDOW

”I dissected all of Hitchcock’s Rear Window and stiched it back together in After Effects. I stabilized all the shots with camera movement in them. Since everything was filmed from pretty much the same angle I was able to match them into a single panoramic view of the entire backyard without any greater distortions. The order of events stays true to the movie’s plot.”

SELECTED GALLERY ☟

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