Tag Archives: miniature

Monsieur Hublot by Stephane Halleux

yo yo FG followerz, its been a long time to be active as “scalesurfer” so let me introduce you to the magical world of S.Halleux and his sculptures

Introducing 

“Monsieur Hublot”

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Image of the Day ● John Frame at the Huntington Library

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Charles Matton recreations – Box a Room

[April 27 – May 25, 2012 ]

On the occasion of the Gallery Weekend in Berlin, the Galerie Michael Haas will open its exhibition with works, or rather boxes, by Charles Matton. The boxes seduce the viewer into an idiosyncratic, imaginary and to some extent very bizarre world

”Born in 1933, the son of a gambling addict who spent his life trying to defeat zero at roulette, his childhood saw a mixture of poverty and luxury, living first in Paris and then Monte Carlo, where his father took over the management of the Hotel Excelsior.

Matton exhibited in his native Paris in the early 60’s before turning to magazine illustration and book publishing. He continued to create art for himself and a small circle of collectors while he worked in New York alongside Jean-Paul Goude to oversee the design of Esquire magazine. He reemerged as an artist in 1983. Although Charles Matton began his career as a painter, he also worked as a draftsman, sculptor, photographer, filmmaker and writer – something that is evident in the way all these creative processes are merged in his later work.”–Anna Bang

Charles Matton — Boite

Briefcase House (2010)

Briefcase House (2010)

Located inside a warehouse loft of 1400 sf with no partition, this project is a house within a house. The design engages two architectural issues: inside/outside and S/XL. It compacts the material possessions of the subject into one oversized briefcase – so large that the subject sleeps inside of it. The residual gap outside of the Briefcase House to the limits of the warehouse loft can be considered a super wall-cavity and rendered as blackened thick wall in an architectural plan. Converseley, when the subject occupies the wall-cavity for other activities, the house can be considered a solid obstruction. This project delineates the qualification of conceptual poche by the swerve of the figure and ground and the of blackening the thick-wall or the private volume.

The project pays homage to Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House and the paintings of Lucio Fontana and Robert Motherwell. The core of the Farnsworth House is key in producing the four architectural programs without erecting one single wall. Like the core of the Farnsworth House, the presence of the Briefcase House inside this warehouse carves out distinct dimensions for appropriate activities. Sitting on castors, the house can be rolled around to distort program proportions. The paintings of Fontana and Motherwell heighten the awareness of negative spaces. As an obstruction, the Briefcase House is a permanent cut on the canvas that gives birth to a new healthy body.

Design: Jimenez Lai

Construction Drawings: Brady Schneider, Cyrus Penarroyo

Construction Leaders: David Ruffing, Brady Schneider, Jimenez Lai

Photography: Jasper Reyes and Kamil Krol

Thank you to the assistance of Jonathan MacGillis, Lauren Turner, Jasper Reyes and Connie Lin

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Our new FG secretary @ the L.A office

Models, sets, dolls and cameras

I know how excited you all are when realizing that many scenes from your favorite movies have been shot in physical models (SS example : Coraline)

Lets take it back to oldskool references on this topic

1) Dolls Replace Drawings in Film Cartoon (Jun, 1938)

Dolls Replace Drawings in Film Cartoon

THOUSANDS of carved wooden dolls give a three-dimensional effect to a new type of animated-cartoon film developed by George Pal, Hungarian photographic expert. Instead of using pictures drawn and photographed in sequence to provide movement, the new cartoon-film technique employs numerous doll figures carved and painted to represent the various movements and facial expressions of a single cartoon character. As many as thirty different carvings of one figure may be photographed in sequence for one simple change in a facial expression.

2) Lilliputian’s-eye viewer puts you inside tiny model (Aug, 1964)

This makes those dorky 3D walk-throughs seem a lot more useful doesn’t it?

Lilliputian’s-eye viewer puts you inside tiny model

A slender optical tube fitted with 18 miniature lenses provides realistic views inside architects’, landscapers’, town planners’, and other scale models. With a camera and adapter on the eyepiece, you get photos like the circular ones at left.

The British-made Modelscope is a combination microscrope, periscope, and telescope with an aperture at one side .3 inch from the end. On the floor of a 1:200 model, this corresponds to eye level at the same scale. At other heights, it shows vistas from windows, balconies, and other points. Made by Optec Reactors, Ltd., of London, the unit is distributed in the U.S. by H. C. I. Sales Corp., NYC.

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