Tag Archives: Creativity

Gettin into Pareidolia [loading 65%]

if we are not too scientific, we are too straightforward to be fascinated

pareidolia may have helped early societies organize chaos and make the world intelligible for our ancestors.

 —————– .Simple quick-picture question.———————-

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HAHA

!! The best percentage wins-

-until further notice!!

Simple def. [wiki]

Pareidolia is a psychological phenomenon involving a vague and random stimulus (often an image or sound) being perceived as significant. Common examples include seeing images of animals or faces in clouds, the man in the moon, and hearing hidden messages on records played in reverse.

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Evolutionary advantage-

-Carl Sagan hypothesized that as a survival technique, human beings are “hard-wired” from birth to identify the human face. This allows people to use only minimal details to recognize faces from a distance and in poor visibility but can also lead them to interpret random images or patterns of light and shade as being faces.

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muhaha..more to come ;)

Charles Matton recreations – Box a Room

[April 27 – May 25, 2012 ]

On the occasion of the Gallery Weekend in Berlin, the Galerie Michael Haas will open its exhibition with works, or rather boxes, by Charles Matton. The boxes seduce the viewer into an idiosyncratic, imaginary and to some extent very bizarre world

”Born in 1933, the son of a gambling addict who spent his life trying to defeat zero at roulette, his childhood saw a mixture of poverty and luxury, living first in Paris and then Monte Carlo, where his father took over the management of the Hotel Excelsior.

Matton exhibited in his native Paris in the early 60’s before turning to magazine illustration and book publishing. He continued to create art for himself and a small circle of collectors while he worked in New York alongside Jean-Paul Goude to oversee the design of Esquire magazine. He reemerged as an artist in 1983. Although Charles Matton began his career as a painter, he also worked as a draftsman, sculptor, photographer, filmmaker and writer – something that is evident in the way all these creative processes are merged in his later work.”–Anna Bang

Charles Matton — Boite

Dazzled Ships WWI \\ Camouflage

British Artist and naval officer Norman Wilkinson had this very insight and pioneered the Dazzle Camouflage movement (known as Razzle Dazzle in the United States). Norman used bright, loud colours and contrasting diagonal stripes to make it incredibly difficult to gauge a ship’s size and direction. It was cheap, effective, and widely-adopted during the War. [1914-1918 play]

Uber cool Photography –> Continue reading

Creative Dad Takes Crazy Photos Of Daughters

Yo,

lets start with that..

why?

< why not >

Anywayz, lets get started with this creative dad. While most of you take time to shoot ur plant or ur cat this guy made a whole narrative our of his daughters’ every day life. We def enjoyed it!

Le Slideshow ☟

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via (le link)

Ciao for now,

EfGi.tim

Images turn Science into Art !

From the dark-matter web of the universe to the rainbow of a mouse’s retina, a new trove of award-winning science images reveals little-seen worlds.
The winners of the 2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge, announced today (Feb. 2) turn dry data into vivid imagery. The informational poster “The Cosmic Web,” for example, used simulations and algorithms to create a fiery, beautiful representation of matter in the universe through time. The image, by Johns Hopkins University cosmologist Miguel Angel Aragon-Calvo, won a spot on the cover of the Feb. 3 issue of the journal Science, which co-sponsors the contest with the National Science Foundation.
The contest also includes interactive games. One honoree this year created one called “Build-a-Body,” in which players can drag and drop organs into a virtual human body, learning anatomy and playing surgeon. Another game allows players to “zoom in” to the human body and look at individual cells.
This year’s winner in the photography category is a stunning photograph of a mouse’s eye. Using a technique called computational molecular phenotyping, University of Utah neuroscientist Bryan William Jones reveals the metabolic diversity of the cells in the creature’s retina.

“The talent of these award winners is remarkable,”

Monica Bradford, the executive editor of the journal Science, said in a statement.

“These winners communicate science in a manner that not only captures your attention,

but in many instances strives to look at different ways to solve scientific problems through their varied art forms.”

#Lets take a look at the Winning.Entries

Teeny-Tiny Tubes

Credit:Joel Brehm, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Office of Research and Economic DevelopmentThis three-dimensional illustration, which garnered an honorable mention, shows the production of carbon nanotubes. University of Nebraska-Lincoln electrical engineer Yongfeng Lu discovered a laser-based production technique that can create these nanotubes to careful specifications.

The Power of Minus Ten

Credit: Laura Lynn Gonzalez, Green-Eye VisualizationTaking an honorable mention in the gaming category, The Power of Minus Ten allows players to zoom in on the human body at different levels of magnification, all the way down to the molecular level as seen in this screengrab.

False Cliff

Credit: Babak Anasori, Michael Naguib, Yury Gogotsi, Michel W. Barsoum, Drexel UniversityIt’s not the edge of the Grand Canyon; this People’s Choice winner was created by placing a layered compound called Ti3AIC2 in hydrofluoric acid. The acid selectively etches away some layers of the compound, creating this odd scene.

Cell Separation

Credit: Andrew Noske, Thomas Deerinck, National Center fo rMicroscopy & imaging Research, University of California, San Diego; Horng Ou, Clodagh O’Shea, Salk InstituteThis image of cell separation garnered a People’s Choice award for its creator. The cell membrane is shown in blue and the cell’s chromosomes in yellow as the cell divides or undergoes mitosis.

Attack of the Antibody

Credit: Emiko Paul and Quade Paul, Echo Medical Media; Ron Gamble, University of Alabama, Birmingham InsightThis honorable mention illustration shows tumor death-cell receptors (DR5) on breast cancer cells targeted by the antibody TRA-8.

Cool as a …

Credit: Robert Rock Belliveau, MDThis honorable mention photo is the skin of an immature cucumber, magnified 800 times. These structures are called “trichomes,” and they act as little spears, protecting the young vegetable from plant-eaters. The lower part of the trichomes contains bitter, toxic chemicals that make herbivores go “ick!”

Ebola Unveiled

Credit: Ivan Konstantinov, Yury Stefanov, Alexander Kovalevsky, Anastasya Bakulina; Visual ScienceThis honorable mention poster reveals the inner and outer workings of the deadly virus Ebola.

Virtual Body

Credit: Jeremy Friedberg (Game designer/producer), Nicole Husain (Content & Writing), Ian Wood (Programming), Genevieve Brydson (Project Management), Wensi Sheng (3D graphics, Compositing/post-production), Lorraine Trecroce (3D graphics, Project Management),The final honorable mention in the gaming category goes to “Build-a-Body,” a game that lets computer users play surgeon — without all that messy blood and bile. Drag-and-drop organs and take anatomy quizzes and you’ll be ready for the OR in no time.

Foldit

Credit: Seth Cooper, David Baker, Zoran Popovic, Firas Khatib, Jeff Flatten, Kefan Xu, Don-Yu Hsiao and Riley Adams, Center for Game Science at the University of Washington.A screengrab from a winning interactive game called “Foldit” that allows players to compete against one another to fold the most efficient protein shape for a task.

The Color of Math

Credit: Konrad Polthier and Konstantin Poelke, Free University of BerlinThis honorable mention visualization shows the visualization of a complex function using colors to represent every complex number. Complex functions are important in math, physics and engineering.

Cellular Heros

Credit: W. Schneller, P.J. Campell, M. Stenerson, D. Bassham & ES Wurtele, Iowa State UniversityIn the plot of Meta!Blast 3D, you’re a hapless lab worker who has to rescue a team of scientists trapped inside a photosynthetic cell. To make matters worse, an unknown pathogen is decimating Earth’s vegetation. Designed for students and educators, this game garnered an honorable mention.

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sources:

mnm (+)
livescience (+)

How to be CREATIVE ? // 33 steps guide