Tag Archives: Creativity

Creative Dad Takes Crazy Photos Of Daughters

Yo,

lets start with that..

why?

< why not >

Anywayz, lets get started with this creative dad. While most of you take time to shoot ur plant or ur cat this guy made a whole narrative our of his daughters’ every day life. We def enjoyed it!

Le Slideshow ☟

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via (le link)

Ciao for now,

EfGi.tim

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Images turn Science into Art !

From the dark-matter web of the universe to the rainbow of a mouse’s retina, a new trove of award-winning science images reveals little-seen worlds.
The winners of the 2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge, announced today (Feb. 2) turn dry data into vivid imagery. The informational poster “The Cosmic Web,” for example, used simulations and algorithms to create a fiery, beautiful representation of matter in the universe through time. The image, by Johns Hopkins University cosmologist Miguel Angel Aragon-Calvo, won a spot on the cover of the Feb. 3 issue of the journal Science, which co-sponsors the contest with the National Science Foundation.
The contest also includes interactive games. One honoree this year created one called “Build-a-Body,” in which players can drag and drop organs into a virtual human body, learning anatomy and playing surgeon. Another game allows players to “zoom in” to the human body and look at individual cells.
This year’s winner in the photography category is a stunning photograph of a mouse’s eye. Using a technique called computational molecular phenotyping, University of Utah neuroscientist Bryan William Jones reveals the metabolic diversity of the cells in the creature’s retina.

“The talent of these award winners is remarkable,”

Monica Bradford, the executive editor of the journal Science, said in a statement.

“These winners communicate science in a manner that not only captures your attention,

but in many instances strives to look at different ways to solve scientific problems through their varied art forms.”

#Lets take a look at the Winning.Entries

Teeny-Tiny Tubes

Credit:Joel Brehm, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Office of Research and Economic DevelopmentThis three-dimensional illustration, which garnered an honorable mention, shows the production of carbon nanotubes. University of Nebraska-Lincoln electrical engineer Yongfeng Lu discovered a laser-based production technique that can create these nanotubes to careful specifications.

The Power of Minus Ten

Credit: Laura Lynn Gonzalez, Green-Eye VisualizationTaking an honorable mention in the gaming category, The Power of Minus Ten allows players to zoom in on the human body at different levels of magnification, all the way down to the molecular level as seen in this screengrab.

False Cliff

Credit: Babak Anasori, Michael Naguib, Yury Gogotsi, Michel W. Barsoum, Drexel UniversityIt’s not the edge of the Grand Canyon; this People’s Choice winner was created by placing a layered compound called Ti3AIC2 in hydrofluoric acid. The acid selectively etches away some layers of the compound, creating this odd scene.

Cell Separation

Credit: Andrew Noske, Thomas Deerinck, National Center fo rMicroscopy & imaging Research, University of California, San Diego; Horng Ou, Clodagh O’Shea, Salk InstituteThis image of cell separation garnered a People’s Choice award for its creator. The cell membrane is shown in blue and the cell’s chromosomes in yellow as the cell divides or undergoes mitosis.

Attack of the Antibody

Credit: Emiko Paul and Quade Paul, Echo Medical Media; Ron Gamble, University of Alabama, Birmingham InsightThis honorable mention illustration shows tumor death-cell receptors (DR5) on breast cancer cells targeted by the antibody TRA-8.

Cool as a …

Credit: Robert Rock Belliveau, MDThis honorable mention photo is the skin of an immature cucumber, magnified 800 times. These structures are called “trichomes,” and they act as little spears, protecting the young vegetable from plant-eaters. The lower part of the trichomes contains bitter, toxic chemicals that make herbivores go “ick!”

Ebola Unveiled

Credit: Ivan Konstantinov, Yury Stefanov, Alexander Kovalevsky, Anastasya Bakulina; Visual ScienceThis honorable mention poster reveals the inner and outer workings of the deadly virus Ebola.

Virtual Body

Credit: Jeremy Friedberg (Game designer/producer), Nicole Husain (Content & Writing), Ian Wood (Programming), Genevieve Brydson (Project Management), Wensi Sheng (3D graphics, Compositing/post-production), Lorraine Trecroce (3D graphics, Project Management),The final honorable mention in the gaming category goes to “Build-a-Body,” a game that lets computer users play surgeon — without all that messy blood and bile. Drag-and-drop organs and take anatomy quizzes and you’ll be ready for the OR in no time.

Foldit

Credit: Seth Cooper, David Baker, Zoran Popovic, Firas Khatib, Jeff Flatten, Kefan Xu, Don-Yu Hsiao and Riley Adams, Center for Game Science at the University of Washington.A screengrab from a winning interactive game called “Foldit” that allows players to compete against one another to fold the most efficient protein shape for a task.

The Color of Math

Credit: Konrad Polthier and Konstantin Poelke, Free University of BerlinThis honorable mention visualization shows the visualization of a complex function using colors to represent every complex number. Complex functions are important in math, physics and engineering.

Cellular Heros

Credit: W. Schneller, P.J. Campell, M. Stenerson, D. Bassham & ES Wurtele, Iowa State UniversityIn the plot of Meta!Blast 3D, you’re a hapless lab worker who has to rescue a team of scientists trapped inside a photosynthetic cell. To make matters worse, an unknown pathogen is decimating Earth’s vegetation. Designed for students and educators, this game garnered an honorable mention.

* * *

sources:

mnm (+)
livescience (+)

How to be CREATIVE ? // 33 steps guide

Discussion // How coffee changed America

Amazing design on visualizing information

“Many of us adore the taste and other sensations of a hot cup of joe, not to mention the comfort and ritual of it, but how much do we want to look behind the bean? For all the talk of caffeine, science actually doesn’t know a lot about its effects on the human body, much less the hundreds of other biologically active ingredients (and their interactions) present in your latte. There’s a lot of debate on how healthful coffee is, and studies often seem to contradict each other.

(Related: “Benefits of Coffee as Garden Compost“)

Coffee also has a complex relationship with culture and the environment. Done “right,” in traditional shade-grown operations, coffee can help preserve valuable semi-forest and forest habitat. It can provide work for rural people and is a primary export of many developing countries.

Done “wrong,” coffee cultivation can result in cleared rainforests, large inputs of pesticides, poisoning of workers, brutally low wages, and degradation of habitats. Many certification schemes have cropped up around the world to give market signals to better producers. I have written extensively about Fair Trade, bird-friendly, organic, Rainforest Alliance-certified, and other programs.

Coffee people are often as passionate about their preferred eco-label as they are about their single-country-of-origin bean or favorite blend, and there are pluses and minuses to every certification. The old adage that coffee “should be triple certified” (planet, people, no pesticides) has largely fallen out of favor, due to the high costs to growers for enrollment in each program and the large areas of overlap among organic, Fair Trade, Rainforest Alliance, and other standards.

Coffee also has a rich cultural history, both in areas where it is grown and in the wider world. Prized seeds were smuggled into remote jungles to jumpstart illicit plantations, and coffeehouses evolved as centers for alternative gatherings. The coffeehouse has often become a lightning rod for debate about globalization, corporate responsibility, and local ownership. (Activists picketing the first Starbucks in my college town once screamed, “Is your coffee worth it?” at me, although they looked bewildered when I told them I had ordered hot chocolate. A week later the large glass windows of the storefront were smashed.)

(Related: “Crafty Ways to Reuse Coffee Bags“)

So although I am now caffeine sensitive myself, and can only enjoy the occasional cup of decaf (I know, sacrilege), I reviewed this new infographic with interest. An acquaintance of mine, Drew Hendricks, does some social media guru work for the company that produced this infographic, and asked if I wanted to run it. He describes the graphic below:

Although native to Northern Africa, coffee has played a major role in America.

First brought here by the British, coffee was once thought of as a mediocre beverage, especially when compared to tea; however, coffee’s popularity in Colonial America skyrocketed after the Boston Tea Party. After this protest on the British tea tax, the drinking of tea was often considered unpatriotic, while the act of drinking coffee became a sign of independence.

Coffee continued to play a role in American culture and society with the creation of the “Coffee Break” during WWII. Having seen the effect of caffeine on the workforce, factory owners began offering workers longer breaks and even supplying coffee.

As represented in this infographic design by Lumin Interactive and Condor Consulting, coffee remains one of the most popular beverages in America, with nearly 80% of the population deemed to be coffee drinkers. Coffee’s popularity continues to increase as coffee houses expand throughout the country.

Brian Clark Howard is a writer and editor with NationalGeographic.com. He was formerly an editor at The Daily Green and E/The Environmental Magazine and has contributed to many publications, including TheAtlantic.com, FastCompany.com, MailOnline.com, PopularMechanics.com, Yahoo!, MSN and elsewhere. His latest book, with Kevin Shea, is Build Your Own Small Wind Power System.”

via// National Geographic (+)

Insane Breaking News // Kanye West THE Architect ✘ (NOT!)

hahahaha,

dezeen after a long time made my day. (I was about to post something else )

WHEN I SAW THIS —->

HAHAHAHAH

FRICKING AMAZING!!!

Remember the time you used to ask stoopid chicks : “whos ur favorite architect?”

and they replied : ” BRAD”

NOT ANYMORE LADIES!!

My next favorite nominee for the Pritzker in terms of creativity and his devotion to the field of architecture and design will be : …..

THIS GUY!

1,

2,

3,

GO

HAHAHAHAHAHAH

Anyway, send ur books to contactDONDA@gmail.com, probably the money will be good and the secretaries ultra hot! + After office drinks will never be the same with KANYE AS YOUR BOSS!!!

lets all hope that he lost a bet or something and his friends made him post these updates. or it is just a twitter rape!

ciao

FG

Building ____ // Life of Sgraffito

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Tuesday morning randomness LEVEL UP on

Sgraffito–> scratching through wet plaster on a wall showing different-colour under surface (2 color)

The title comes from italian “sgraffito” –  a wall decor technique commonly used in Europe to decorate castles and chateaus during the Renaissance.
— Italy in the 16th century

Sgraffito played a significant role during the years of the Renaissance in Italy.  As a simple native art old examples of sgraffito were found in Florence and more specifically in the chateaus , Palazzo Ramirez de Montalvo and Palazzo Peppi  [draft sketch included for the first one to GET you in the subject]

—Germany-Bavaria——Austria

During the 16th century the technique was brought to Germany by the master builders of the Renaissance and taken up with enthusiasm by the formative craftsmen..

—Spain-Catalonia

In Catalonia, sgraffito was implemented in the early 20th century by the Noucentista neo-classical architects and became a recurrent technique in façade decoration.

[Lets get more into it]
VISUAL LEVEL UP
[nothing between post & gallery]

many bows to Wikimedia Commons

Introducting Apophenia // Leave 0.05% out and GOTCHA

Yo my minion readers.

Until now you have responded quite well to all the “wisdom” posts in the FG. So we decided to kick up the level of your intelligence with a series of new articles

Please enjoy and get some XP points asap..

SO,

We find ourselves in an unquestioning, patternless existence where everything occurs seemingly without reason.

There is no learning from experience: “Once bitten, twice shy,” becomes “Once bitten, never shy,” and the rhythms of the natural world are unappreciated

—0—

Lets take alook

How We Believe (Times Books),Michael Shermer.Scientific American(+),

‘’I argue that our brains are belief engines: evolved pattern-recognition machines that connect the dots and create meaning out of the patterns that we think we see in nature. Sometimes A really is connected to B; sometimes it is not. When it is, we have learned something valuable about the environment from which we can make predictions that aid in survival and reproduction. We are the ancestors of those most successful at finding patterns. This process is called association learning, and it is fundamental to all animal behavior, from the humble worm C. elegans to H. sapiens.’’

Hmm..[believing that we are 70% on the same page here], a sample connection example is tested

Using evolutionary modeling(aha) and having a demonstration through it, Harvard University biologist Kevin R. Foster and University of Helsinki biologist Hanna Kokko in ’08.. tested the theory and tried to have a gist out of it:

They begin with the formula pb > c,

where a belief may be held when the cost (c) of doing so is less than the probability (p) of the benefit (b). For example, believing that the rustle in the grass is a dangerous predator when it is only the wind does not cost much, but believing that a dangerous predator is the wind may cost an animal its life. !!

Gist: natural selection will favor patternicity..whenever |the cost of believing a false pattern is real| is less than |the cost of not believing a real pattern|

[Our goal is to never fall under 80%.. Although reaching a high barrier consists a lot of  mind streaming continuation]

[Example]

SO NOW WE CAN BE MORE STRAIGHTFORWARD

-weakness of human cognision=pervasive(to any direction) tendency of human beings to see order in random configurations

—0—

-[bot special(+)]

”the entire enterprise of science, after all, is the organized and rational search for order in the seeming randomness surrounding us'(skeptic)   + “Science is not formal logic, it needs the free play of the mind in as great a degree as any other creative art.”(believer) =“merely noting patterns or coincidences is not proof in and of itself but, applied properly, can be the creative leap needed to devise new and testable hypotheses.”(DBS Sceptic)

Being a bit fussy[open for anykind of fight] could never really help anyone, so lets experience the  proposed INJECTION on  meaningful coincidence in life

  • Every coincidence is meaningful
  • It  happens to everyone but the person far best qualified to comprehend them is the one whom they occur to
  • It  is usually confirmation of whatever it is you are engaged in at the moment.
  • All meaningful coincidences(Synchronicity) are indeed signs pointing us in a specific direction at the most opportune moment.

~Creativity + Apophenia~

[Bonus to start with +5%] Brugger describes a “‘relativity of creativity,’ i.e., [a] continuum from creative detection of real patterns at one end, to the ‘hypercreative’ interpretation of patterns in ‘noise’ [randomness] at the other end.”

Leonardo Da Vinci, utilizing this tendency in order to harness the creativity of his students, advised them to :

Look at walls covered with many stains . . . with the idea of imagining some scene, you will see in it a similarity to landscapes adorned with mountains, rivers, rocks, trees, plains, broad valleys, and hills of all kinds… also battles and figures with lively gestures and strange faces and costumes and an infinity of things which you can reduce to separate and complex forms.

[Nothing but net]

Apophenia, in its more benign(!) state provides us

1)a powerful tool to make sense and safety of the world and people around us.

2) it is a well-spring of pseudo-science and nonsense, an irrational leap bypassing reason and rationality.

science fiction

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