Tag Archives: axonometric

Retrofitting the American Dream

Enjoy few images from this interesting project. The main reason I decided to post it was the physical models made during the process. Its been a long time since we posted actual models made by students. Although they are not really “study” models as entitled by the author they still super cool.!

  • Retrofitting The American Dream
    Student: Artur Nesterenko. Instructor: Berenika Boberska. Woodbury University
  •  “The 2007 market crash forced a relocation of suburban housing into a high-density, pedestrian-friendly neighborhood of the center city and inner suburbs. This created a profound structural shift – a reversal of what took place in the 1950s, when drivable suburbs boomed and flourished as center cities emptied and withered. The fact that the land under the house has no value and the houses are worth less than they would cost to be replaced, creates a big possibility that many fringe suburbs will turn into waste lands, with abandoned houses and a rising crime rate.

    This crash once again gives tremendous opportunity and draws the attention of the architects into the suburbs. It reminds us that we should no longer be worrying about how we are going to design communities in the future, but what we are going to do with the communities that we are left with. Instead of demolishing an abandoned neighborhood, I am proposing to deconstruct and re-purpose the remains of abandoned houses into a new construction tool according to the client’s needs and interests. The idea is to use the fabric of a failed neighborhood as a form work to construct a new type of housing with injected shared spaces and public structures. The rafters of single detached houses, the floor joists, the studs, pipes, details and the house itself with all of the structural elements will be re-used as form work to retrofit the American Dream. 

    I decided to create imaginary clients with different professions that would be interested in buying  abandoned houses to deconstruct and redesign to create new houses according to client needs. “

    Clients:
    Inventor
    Baker
    Astronomer

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Perspective Drawing // Extracts of Local Distance

So,

the power of the drawing, discover your project through ur drawings, try to design in perspective, killer drawing, bla bla bla 

Someone actually googled “draw like in presidents medals” and landed in the FG = Lolz

Anyway, here is a set of different perspective drawings, created by existing photos of buildings. The collages look ultra-cool but since the same technique is used in every photo-reference, once youve seen the result 2-3 times it becomes ultra-repetitive.

Still cool at the moment, so enjoy!

.1) Untitled mix

.2) Radio Bremen

.3) Kunsthalle Hamburg

.4) Funkhaus

.5) Elberg Campus

.6) Bibliothek Uni Hamburg

via (+)

- BONUS -

Some math skills//Penrose tilings

time to get really serial….

we decided to give you an extra piece of super serial wisdom for your TRUE architecture….

so some experience points that are going to be serially appreciated by all of those parammetric/grasshopper freaks out there….

Penrose tilings

Penrose tiling is a non-periodic tiling generated by an aperiodic set of prototiles. Penrose tilings are named after mathematician and physicist Roger Penrose who investigated these sets in the 1970s. The aperiodicity of the Penrose prototiles implies that a shifted copy of a Penrose tiling will never match the original. A Penrose tiling may be constructed so as to exhibit both reflection symmetry and fivefold rotational symmetry, as in the diagram below.

A Penrose tiling has many remarkable properties, most notably:

  • It is non-periodic, which means that it lacks any translational symmetry. More informally, a shifted copy will never match the original.
  • It is self-similar, so the same patterns occur at larger and larger scales. Thus, the tiling can be obtained through “inflation” (or “deflation”) and any finite patch from the tiling occurs infinitely many times.
  • It is a quasicrystal: implemented as a physical structure a Penrose tiling will produce Bragg diffraction and its diffractogram reveals both the fivefold symmetry and the underlying long range order.
Penrose tilings are simple examples of aperiodic tilings of the plane.A tiling is a covering of the plane by tiles with no overlaps or gaps; the tiles normally have a finite number of shapes, called prototiles, and a set of prototiles is said to admit a tiling or tile the plane if there is a tiling of the plane using only tiles congruent to these prototiles. The most familiar tilings (e.g., by squares or triangles) are periodic: a perfect copy of the tiling can be obtained by translating all of the tiles by a fixed distance in a given direction. Such a translation is called a period of the tiling; more informally, this means that a finite region of the tiling repeats itself in periodic intervals. If a tiling has no periods it is said to be non-periodic. A set of prototiles is said to beaperiodic if it tiles the plane, but every such tiling is non-periodic; tilings by aperiodic sets of prototiles are called aperiodic tilings.

Early aperiodic tables

The subject of aperiodic tilings received new interest in the 1960s when logician Hao Wang noted connections betweendecision problems and tilings. In particular, he introduced tilings by square plates with colored edges, now known as Wang dominoes or tiles, and posed the “Domino Problem“: to determine whether a given set of Wang dominoes could tile the plane with matching colors on adjacent domino edges. He observed that if this problem were undecidable, then there would have to exist an aperiodic set of Wang dominoes. At the time, this seemed implausible, so Wang conjectured no such set could exist.

an aperiodic set of Wang dominoes

Robinson’s six prototiles

The first Penrose tiling(P1 below)  is also an aperiodic set of six prototiles, introduced by Roger Penrose in a 1974 paper, but is based on pentagons rather than squares. Any attempts to tile the plane with regular pentagons will necessarily leave gaps, but Johannes Kepler showed, in his 1619 work Harmonices Mundi, that these gaps could be filled using pentagrams (viewed as star polygons), decagons and related shapes. Acknowledging inspiration from Kepler, Penrose was able to find matching rules (which can be imposed by decorations of the edges) for these shapes, in order to obtain an aperiodic set; his tiling can be viewed as a completion of Kepler’s finite Aa pattern, and other traces of these ideas can be found in Albrecht Dürer’s work.

Penrose subsequently reduced the number of prototiles to two, discovering the kite and dart tiling(P2) and the rhombus tiling(P3). The rhombus tiling was independently discovered by Robert Ammann in 1976. Penrose and John H. Conway investigated the properties of Penrose tilings, and discovered that a substitution property explained their hierarchical nature; their findings were publicized by Martin Gardner in his January 1977 “Mathematical Games” column in Scientific American.

In 1981, De Bruijn explained a method to construct Penrose tilings from five families of parallel lines as well as a “cut and project method”, in which Penrose tilings are obtained as two-dimensional projections from a five-dimensional cubic structure. In this approach, the Penrose tiling is viewed as a set of points, its vertices, while the tiles are geometrical shapes obtained by connecting vertices with edges.

The pentagonal Penrose tiling (P1) drawn in black on a colored rhombus tiling (P3) with yellow edges.

A P1 tiling using Penrose’s original set of 6 prototiles

Pentagon with an inscribed thick rhomb (light), acute Robinson triangles (lightly shaded) and a small obtuse Robinson triangle (darker). Dotted lines give additional edges for inscribed kites and darts.

Partial inflation of star to yield rhombs, and of a collection of rhombs to yield an ace.

some xtra cool visuals to boost your creativity……

*bonus_cos’ we aint no nerds…*

(ha ha…gotcha)

President’s Medals//Epic Fail No.1 OR a speculative research in the middle of nowhere

^^^, sup little bitchez!!?

Just yesterday we had a crazy night out with Winy the Maass. During the crazy champagne war action we had the chance to discuss a super juicy architectural topic.
The potential difference between stealing, copying and developping someone’s else idea.
Need I not refer to our close friend Mark.

Anyway, just after revealing to you both Part 1 & 2 President’s Medals Winners we have a series of projects which have caught our attention.

Today we will be sharing with you a continuation of Carl Fredrik Valdemar Hellberg’s work coming straight from the AA in London.

Here is a link to the original project submitted (+)

“In the desert northeast of Los Angeles in an abandoned city called California City the 739600m2 Second Community floats above the desert floor like a mountain avatar. In its crater the 1500 heliostatic mirrors reflect the light onto the artificial sky covering the desert of the trans-identity port. With a capacity of 40,000 people the port gathers in its featureless white space individuals open to role-play. “

“The Second Community explores an alternative identity tourism that goes beyond the virtual space of online role-playing games, the open desert of the Burning Man festival and the convention halls of Cosplayers.”

“Spanning half a kilometer the artificial desert of the port isolates the person in a void of imagination where the persona of an individual becomes a fugitive and creative semiotic gadget which collectively generate a public space of radical self exploration an experimentation.”

“The porous mountain avatar surrounding and supporting the sky of the port collects its energy from the concentrated solar power plant in the center of the crater, harvesting the power of the sun and delivers it to the caves around the centered port where the identity tourists prepare for the events in the port.”

“Totally! And I was like, this thing is full on ugly. Like a bridge on acid with all that metal and stuff. And oh my God, its freaking huge and it was so strange, cuz there were like no walls or doors and everything was like totally white.”

“There were like thousands of people totally doing weird cool stuff. You should totally come, its freakin gnarly!”

For the F.G team this was an opportunity to initiate a speculative research concerning projects in the middle of nowhere.

Big up to mi boi Valdemar and our hommies down the AA and RIBA

cheerioO